Photo by Mr Azed | flickr.com

Prince William and Kate Middleton recently tied the royal knot on Friday April 29th in what is claimed to be the wedding of the century. The wedding attracted 1 million spectators outside Buckingham Palace and Westminster Abbey.  This is hardly surprising considering that over 1900 guests were invited and countless news broadcast stations were in London to cover the historical tie.  

However, amidst the glam and fairytale setting, there was a cost to the environment. It has been estimated that the royal wedding emitted more green house gases in one day (around 6800 tonnes of Carbon Dioxide), than Buckingham Palace produces in a whole year.

To put this into another perspective, the royal wedding produced the same level of green house gas emissions as what 1230 households in the UK produces annually. The contributions of the carbon dioxide emissions were analyzed, and it turns out that the long-distance travelling of celebrity guests like the Beckhams and the thousands of other people that flew to London to see the wedding.

The remaining 13 tonnes of Carbon dioxide that was generated from the wedding was due to catering, accommodations, energy use, and landfill. The amount greenhouse gases emitted by the royal wedding are astonishing; thankfully, an event of this proportion only occurs once every 13 years.

Although April 29th did have massive green house gas emissions, it is important to note that this royal wedding has been the most environmentally friendly one yet. The couple chose to have local flowers and serve local food; they also made sure that lights were turned off whenever they weren’t being used.  

The couple also requested donations to a list of charities as wedding gifts, upon which one of the charities was Earthwatch (an International non-profit organization that focuses on sustaining the natural environment). 

Upon viewing the wedding I did think that it could have been made more environmentally friendly; however, I was pleased to see that the royal couple did take the environment into consideration and I hope they will continue to do so.

Posted
AuthorSandra Lynsdale
CategoriesSustainability