Posts tagged Vancouver International Film Festival
VIFF Film Review: Ice and the Sky

Ice and Sky (La Glace et le Ciel) provides you with the opportunity to learn about glaciers and see how glaciologist Claude Lorius conducts research in the frigid continent of Antarctica. Having known very little about glaciology, I learned a lot about how glaciology demonstrates the impact of climate change and project where we’re headed in the years to come.

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VIFF Film Review: Haida Gwaii: On the Edge of the World

As the name of the film suggests, this film is truly a cinematic adventure to the edge of the world. With such as inspiring look into this archipelago on the North Coast of British Columbia, one cannot help but leave the film with an intense connection to its people, place, and culture. Haida Gwaii: To the Edge of the World dynamically portrays the current status of this picturesque collection of islands and its beautiful people.

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VIFF Film Review: Banking Nature

Banking Nature asks its viewers to confront the vitally important, yet somewhat discomforting, question of whether we’ve sold-out Mother Nature. By putting a price on services that nature provides to humans – like the purification of air by forests - are we strategically embracing market logic to prevent future environmental harm? Or are we paving a dangerous path toward the commodification of nature by profit-driven corporations and banks? 

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Talking salmon and sustainability with The Pristine Coast's Scott Renyard.

In the spring of 2010, Director Scott Renyard began following the wild salmon story from Alexandra’s “Get Out Migration” protest walk from her home at the northern tip of Vancouver Island to the Provincial Capital, Victoria. Thousands of British Columbians joined her, all demanding answers.

We met up with Reynard to talk about The Pristine Coast and his journey of making the film.

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Review: Walking Under Water

In Walking Under Water, filmmaker Eliza Kubarska dives off the beautiful coast of Borneo into the underwater culture of the Badjao, a tribe who has no country or formal ties to any government. Living between Borneo, the Philippines and Indonesia for centuries, the Badjao tribe maintains a nomadic, seafaring lifestyle with a deep connection to the natural environment its incredible power to provide sustenance.

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Review: Marmato

The film Marmato takes you on a journey to the small resource town by the same name and exposes you to their way of life. The residents of the town lead humble lives while exposing themselves to the dangerous elements that surround them. And although these fears are genuine, the community feels an attachment and belonging to their gold mines - one they aren’t willing to give away. The film follows the town’s six-year struggle as Canadian resource extraction companies intervene with Marmato’s mines. The dichotomy between foreign investors and community-based economies is apparent as protesters take to the streets, all in the name of fairness and justice.

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Review: Red Knot

Red Knot captures the painful emotions and interactions between newlyweds Peter (Vincent Kartheiser) and Chloe (Olivia Thirlby) as they settle into their honeymoon on a research vessel to Antarctica. The landscape becomes familiar through watching (or wincing at) the human interactions as the characters find themselves on land. As we see Peter and Chloe marvelling at the flora and fauna, as they amble off down a rocky beach to the ocean, it leaves us longing to visit the continent. Though it is doubtful that the primary aim of the movie is to expose people to the beauty and wilderness of the south pole, it is unavoidable; even those who are not usually drawn to nature documentaries will find themselves wide-eyed.

 

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