Posts tagged Water
Nestlé is not the bad guy when it comes to bottled water.

Nestlé gets a lot of flack for applying for permits to bottle and sell water from 29 facilities across North America. But let's not forget, they are in the profit-making business. They are interested in selling products that consumers will buy. Don’t get me wrong, I’m frustrated by the devastating environmental impacts of bottled water too, but I’m even more infuriated by those that create the demand for these products.

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Metro Vancouver's water shortage: Affecting more than your home-grown tomatoes.

Many Vancouverites would have once considered the idea of water shortage in this area impossible. This mindset is reflected in the 350 litres of water per day consumed by Canadians, while Europeans use an average of only 150 litres. My mother used to say that we’ll never run out of water in the Greater Vancouver area - but this year shows us it just might be possible.

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Water down the drain.

Every month people around the world move into new homes, and whether apartments or ranch estates, a new abode is likely to come with new discoveries like an odd smelling cupboard, a light switch with no apparent purpose, or a leaky faucet. I recently had the pleasure of moving into a new apartment and have been privy to some out of the ordinary excitement. Something that stuck out for me was the experience of my first shower in the new apartment; I felt like Kramer in the Seinfeld episode where he is ravaged by his hyperactive showerhead. The jet stream was so intense it hurt my nipples, and the pressure of the water caused the shower curtain to float up like an apparition. On top of my newfound nipple pain, I was suddenly struck by the incredible amount of water coming out of the showerhead, and my mind wandered and wondered down the drain, thinking of all that wasted water and the costs that go with it.

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Canadian water myths.

Cholera breakouts, water-boiling advisories, death by E.coli, skin lesions, and more can all be caused by poor quality water. These incidents are not uncommon in many areas of the world, including Canada where quality and quantity are delineated primarily by race and geography. There are certain myths in Canadian culture regarding both the quantity and quality of the nation's water, and while many myths can be true in certain circumstances the general myths regarding Canadian water does mask many problems concerning water policies and environmental realities. My question is, how factual are these myths and what purpose do they serve in Canada?     

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